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This course, taught primarily in a lecture format, offers a broad chronological survey of American history. The first half of the course focuses on the origins and development of Colonial North America, the American Revolution, the Early National period, the Jacksonian era, the coming of the Civil War, and the Civil War and Reconstruction eras. The second half of the course focuses on the post-1877 period: the Gilded Age, the progressive era, the 1920s, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War era, and recent America.​​

International Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies2.MasterInternational Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies
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This intensive reading and writing course provides a comprehensive introduction to the study of American fiction, poetry and drama. Focusing on representative works of literature and literary criticism, the course examines the evolution of the American literary scene from its colonial origins to the experimental forms and deconstructionist critiques of the 1990s. The first half of the course considers the works of early writers such as Cooper, Hawthorne, Emerson, Poe, Melville, Twain, Dickinson, Stowe, Whitman, and Howells. The second half focuses on 20th century writers such as Dreiser, Eliot, Fitzgerlad, Wharton, Lewis, Steinbeck, Hemingway, Faulkner, Stevens, Pound, Wilson, Brooks, Albee, Williams, Wright, Hughes, Ellison, Miller, Bellow, Hellman, Updike, Barth, Morrison, Walker, Pynchon, Styron, Oates, and Vonnegut. This course also shed light on American philosophy as a reflection of a unique American culture distinct from the European experience due to its tackling of several issues that weren't present in the European world, in doing such, the course covers the works of such American philosophers as Emerson, Thoreau, Douglass, Dewy, William James and Jane Adams.​​

International Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies2.MasterInternational Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies
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This course offers an in-depth examination of American politics and government. The first half of the course deals with the origins, evolution, and maturation of the American federal republic, focusing on the development of the United States Constitution, the two party system, and mass politics. The goal is to acquaint students with the structure, functions, processes, and traditions of local, state, and national government, and with the complexities of American political culture. The second half of the course explores the theory and practice of democracy in the contemporary United States, placing American politics and government in comparative perspective.

International Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies2.MasterInternational Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies
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This course examines the historical development and present character and condition of the American economy. The course places the American economic system in historical and comparative perspective by analyzing the institutional structures, inner workings, and ideological relations of American economic life. Areas of focus include: the origins and early development of regional economies, the emergence and maturation of a national market economy, the ideological and cultural underpinnings of American capitalism, the evolution of commercial agriculture, the development of financial and banking institutions, industrialization and the triumph of corporate culture, patterns of competition and monopoly, cycles of boom and bust, mass production and consumption, organized labor and labor-management relations, international trade and protectionism, public relations and advertising, Taylorism and the gospel of efficiency, unemployment and the problem of economic inequality, migrant and immigrant labor,, speculative behavior and the stock market, de-industrialization and social implications of abundance and economic growth.​​

International Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies2.MasterInternational Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies
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This course examines the history of American foreign relations and diplomacy, with a special emphasis on America's emergence as a world power in the 20th century. Following a general survey of the per 1900-era, the course offers an in-depth analysis of American attitudes toward 20th century imperialism and colonialism, the impact of World War I and the isolationist-internationalist debate of the 1920s, the internationalist initiatives of World War II and the Cold War era, the stresses and legacies of the Vietnam War and the post-Cold War adjustments of the 1990s.​​

International Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies2.MasterInternational Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies
  

This interdisciplinary course examines the evolution of American society over four centuries, focusing on broad patterns of change and continuity in American social structures and social norms. Important areas of inquiry include: demography, family life, women's history and gender relationships, age relationships and gerontology, social and economic class, social mobility, migration, regional variations, community studies, and the social implications of urbanization and industrializ.​​

International Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies2.MasterInternational Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies
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This course examines the long history of interactions between the United States and the Arab world, with a special emphasis on the nature of contemporary relations between American and Arab cultures. Important areas of inquiry include: the history of American foreign policy in the Middle East, diplomatic relations between Arabs and the United States, the impact of the Cold War, terrorism and military conflict in Arab-American relations, the influence of American culture on the Arab world, the evolution of American attitudes towards Arab cultures and the Islamic world, Arab immigration to the United States and the development of Arab-American culture, the experiences of Arab Americans in the contemporary United States, contemporary Arab attitudes towards the United States, and the evolving economic relationship between the United States and the Arab World.​​

International Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies2.MasterInternational Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies
  

This course explore the physical and cultural geography of the United States. Following an introduction to the historical geography of the United States, the course turns to the geographic complexities of recent and contemporary America. The primary aim of the course is to provide students with a sophisticated understanding o the geographic context of social, cultural, economic, and political life in the United Stated. Much of the course focuses on regional variation and the persistence of distinctive regional cultures such as those of the Deep South, New England, the Middle Atlantic States, the Midwest, the Pacific Northwest, the Southwest, the Sunbelt, and the Great Plains.​​

International Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies2.MasterInternational Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies
  

This course examines pressure and interest groups in the United States and their impact on the domestic and foreign policy of the country. This includes an analysis of the major pressure groups in America today in all relevant fields such as the economic sector, domestic politics, minority rights, and foreign policy, as well as as investigation of the methods used by these groups to advance their agendas.​​

International Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies2.MasterInternational Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies
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This course examines the development of American culture by drawing upon the perspectives of liberty, anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, and aesthetics. Placing special emphasis on the 20th century, the course surveys a wide variety of distinctively American cultural forms and traditions. Students explore a range of topics related to “high” culture, popular culture, and folk culture: art and architecture, music, film, television, and the role of the media in American life, food and fashion, sports and leisure, religion, education, the commodification of culture, and regional and ethnic folkways.​​

International Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies2.MasterInternational Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies
  

This course provides an overview of American relations with the rest of the world and their effect on the international scene. This include American foreign relations during the 20th and the 21st centuries. The course focuses on American ties with China, Russia (and the Soviet Union previously), Latin America, and the European Union, all the while analyzing any changes that have been witnessed in the course of these relations.​​

International Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies2.MasterInternational Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies
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This course aims to investigate the role played by media in American life, especially in the 20th century. It analyzes the role played by the media during the period of World War I and II, and the Cold War and the post-Cold War era. This course studies the ways that the media affect public opinion in America and to exert pressure on American administrations. It also sheds light on the attitudes of American media toward such hot topics as communism, Islam, the Arab world, and America's war on terror.​​

International Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies2.MasterInternational Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies
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This is a variable topic course designed to allow students to concentrate on a special topic not offered in the regular list of compulsory and elective courses. Students are limited to one course (3 credit hours) in the Special Subject category. Possible special topics include: History of American Women, History of American Art, History of American Music, American Environmental History, the Cold War and American Society, the American South, the American West, Colonial America, the American Revolution, Civil War and Reconstruction, American Urban History, the Modern American Novel, African-American History, American Indian History, Film and American Popular Culture, America in the 1960s, American Folklore, American Slavery, and Social Issues of Contemporary America.​​

International Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies2.MasterInternational Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies
  

This course explores the role of religions in American history and contemporary America. Beginning with the religious encounters of the early-seventeenth century, the course examines the variety, complexity, and significance of American religious life. In this course students examine the full range of American religious institutions, traditions, and impulses, including: Puritanism, Anglicanism; Quakerism, Evangelism and the Great Awakenings; American adaptations of Roman Catholicism, Lutheranism, Presbyterianism, and Methodism, Mormonism; Shakerism; the Ghost Dance and American Indian religions; Christian Socialism; Reform Judaism; the Southern Baptist Convention; the African Methodist-Episcopal Church and other African-American denominations; religions as a powerful force in the American Civil Rights movement; Pentecostalism; Jehovah’s Witnesses; Black Muslims and the Nation of Islam; Christian Science; Scientology; Televangelism; the “Born Again” movement and the Christian coalition; modern American variations of Islam. Buddhism, and Eastern religions; Spiritualism; New Age religions; and various forms of the occult. The primary focus of the course is cultural, not theological, nor theological analysis.​​

International Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies2.MasterInternational Relations and Diplomatic and Regional StudiesMA in American Studies
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This is an advanced course in methodological, theoretical and technical issues in international studies. The course focuses on philosophy of social sciences and research ethics, comparative methods in international studies, and on combining qualitative and quantitative methods. Students will study research design, techniques of data collection, sampling and measurement, report and proposal writings, statistical analysis with computer application game theory.​​

International DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development2.MasterInternational DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development
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This course examines the evolution, expansion and enforcement of international law of human rights, with an emphasis on international human rights agreements, international and regional human rights tribunals, and international human rights organizations, both governmental and non-governmental. The course also examines civil, political, economic, social, and cultural rights, and assesses the range of international monitoring and supervision regimes, including the major international treaties and bodies, and the protection of children, women and minorities, as well as the role of NGOs in safeguarding such rights.​​

International DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development2.MasterInternational DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development
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The course is designed to introduce the main theoretical models, providing explanations and strategies for economic growth. Examined within a theoretical framework, the multi-faceted dimension of ethical challenges with respect to international aid, cooperation and development policies, provide a theoretical and measurement basis for welfare, poverty and inequality analysis. Also, basic principles of the capability approach will be introduced: Human Development Index (HDI), the Gender Related Index (GDI), the Gender Empowerment Measure (GEM) and the Human Poverty Indexes (HPI-1 and HPI-2).​​

International DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development2.MasterInternational DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development
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This course will introduce students to the emergence of Islam over 1400 years ago in a comparative approach highlighting the most important social and political aspects of the powers adjacent to the Arabian peninsula, i.e. Rome and Persia, and what kind of rights Islam gave for people in the peninsula, both those who embraced Islam and those who did not. Special focus will be on the social life of Makkah compared with the newly established religious-based state in Madinah, comparing
this, further, with the social and political life in the most important big empires at the time, namely Rome and Persia. The course also highlights the contributions of Islam in modern times, especially in regards to matters not covered by international legislation, as well as the similarities and differences between international and Islamic legislation.​​

International DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development2.MasterInternational DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development
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The course explores the interplay between politics and human rights with a social sciences approach. It covers four broad topics: the role of human rights in international security cooperation human development and in international political economy, domestic responses to an international norm, and new challenges to the international order. Human rights are considered from three perspectives: theoretical concepts, such as economic justice and political legitimacy; governmental decision making, such as security, development, and trade policies; and case studies, on topics such as international conflicts, human development structural adjustment programs, and corporate social responsibility. The course examines unresolved theoretical and practical issues concerning the universality of human rights and whether human rights conventions, laws, and regimes are effective and their role in advancing human development.​​

International DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development2.MasterInternational DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development
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This is a comparative course in theories of human rights, drawing on political theory as philosophy; the course will introduce students to philosophical questions concerning the foundations of human rights. What are human rights based on? What makes something a human right? Are human rights universally and permanently valid or is the notion of human rights merely a construct of modern Western culture? The course will familiarize students with alternative theoretical answers to these and other related questions.​​

International DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development2.MasterInternational DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development
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This course introduces the international humanitarian law, focusing on its fundamental premises, legal nature, relation to the international human rights law, its roots in the Geneva Convention and the Hague Law, and the various types of armed conflict. It also tackles the international humanitarian law in the context of armed conflicts and the moral implications of war. Furthermore, the course touches on the national and international measures taken to curb humanitarian law violations.​​

International DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development2.MasterInternational DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development
  

 The course introduces students to the principles, methodologies and procedures used in monitoring the application of human rights in both the national and international arenas. Current UN monitoring systems will be analyzed. Students will be alerted to the politics of international monitoring and to the various views in this regard. Particularly, students will have knowledge of the United Nations and its human rights processes as well as ways to make use of the system in the promotion of human rights. Students will have the chance to master the skills of monitoring and report writing on domestic issues of human rights. They will be introduced to the mechanisms used in the preparation of the Jordan report on Child Rights and other conventions.​​

International DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development2.MasterInternational DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development
  

The course enables students to explore in depth the relationship between human rights and human development. Toward this end, it identifies and examines at length the interconnections between these two crucial components of societal progress, focusing on their implications with respect to larger issues of social equity and development. A number of specific success case studies from various societies linking human rights and human development will be studied. The course will also be dealing with challenges and obstacles facing students, researchers, and workers in the field, specifically those concerned with the compatibility and incongruity of human rights and human development. By the end of the course, students will be acquainted with how human development enhances the capabilities and freedoms of community members, and how human rights influence such capabilities and freedoms.​​

International DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development2.MasterInternational DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development
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This course highlights the remarkable progress that has taken place over the past three decades with respect to human development. It also takes note of the big gap that still exists between the status quo and the desired objectives: the world poverty ratio is alarming, female participation in economic activities and political life is low, job opportunities and social services available in rural areas are insignificant compared to urban areas. The course maintains that development should be focused on people, economic participation of women and grass roots should be emphasized, and the role of democracy and decentralization expanded, and investment concepts should be stretched to encompass human capital in the areas of education, health and vocational training.​​

International DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development2.MasterInternational DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development
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The course analyzes structures and processes of Arab political systems and their impact on human rights in the Arab world. It also focuses on the social and cultural context of the political process and explains the causes behind the emergence and development of constitutional rights, concepts, and practices. Emphases are on the analysis of civil, political, economic and cultural rights. Through some case studies, the course analyzes the status quo of human rights in the Arab world and its relation to the political systems.​​

International DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development2.MasterInternational DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development
  

This course is based on the principle that the value base of the social work profession is grounded in principles common to those in the human rights movement and how, in their daily practice, social workers are advancing human rights--of their clients, communities, nation, and world. Having a sense of solidarity with others, in other fields of endeavor and in other countries, students will learn how to link the social work profession to human rights and how human rights principles might apply in practice situations. The practical aspects of the course will focus on vulnerable groups--women, children, persons with disabilities, older persons, and persons affected by racism and show how human rights documents address the rights of members of vulnerable populations.

International DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development2.MasterInternational DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development
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Linkages between health and environment are increasingly recognized. Pollution and imbalance in the ecosystem will undoubtedly harm human health. The course aims to firstly introduce students to major conventions establishing human rights norms relating to health. It addresses governments’ obligations to ensuring human rights to health. Secondly, the course highlights the importance of ensuring environmental development and sustainability. With the help of some case studies, the impact of nuclear weapons on human rights to health and human rights to unpolluted environment will be addressed.​​

International DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development2.MasterInternational DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development
  

This course introduces students to the theoretical framework of women’s rights, and to the role which international law plays in securing rights for women across borders. The various obstacles facing women in attaining the same social, cultural and economic status as men will be addressed in this course with some emphasis on obstacles specific to the Middle East region. Efforts made by governments and women’s NGOs to enhance women’s contribution will be addressed. This course will also tackle some case studies relating to social development strategies for gender integration in areas such as economy, health, politics and education.​​

International DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development2.MasterInternational DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development
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The course examines the historical development of children’s and youth’s rights as well as international and regional instruments by which these rights are established and enforced. The course also aims at presenting case studies to explain how governments can develop relevant policies to secure a safe and stimulating environment to children and youth, and how this part of the population can be integrated actively in decision making and the activities of civil society.​​

International DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development2.MasterInternational DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development
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This is a course on the status and evaluating human rights in Jordan. The course studies and evaluates political, legal and procedurals issues related to human rights in Jordan. The course focuses on analyzing national regional and international reports on human rights in Jordan and introduces a linkage between human rights and human development.​​

International DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development2.MasterInternational DevelopmentMA in Human Rights and Human Development
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